Thetford Library Federation

 


Thetford' s On-line Library Search

Table of Contents

About the Library Federation

Events

Component Libraries

News

 

Librarian:

Peter Blodgett

 

Public Hours

Peabody Library

  • Tuesday: 8:00 - 5:00
  • Wednesday: 2:00 - 8:30 PM

Latham Library

  • Monday: 2:00 - 8:30 PM
  • Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday: 2:00 - 5:00PM
  • Friday: 9:00 - 5:00
  • Saturday: 10:00 - 1:00

Thetford Elementary School Library


About the Library Federation

In 1972, the libraries of the villages united to form a working "federation" composed of Latham and Peabody public libraries, the Historical Society Library, the Thetford Academy Library, and the Elementary School Library. The Federation's two public libraries have 2,156 members. (A third library in the village of Thetford Center donated its collection to Latham on Thetford Hill and closed its doors.)

The goal of federation was to create a unified system for the whole town. Books are shared by the libraries. The five member libraries enjoy the benefits of a plan of service that encourages complementary collections and programs tailored to fit groups active in each member library. New materials are bought on a staggered schedule so fresh titles are offered when they are most in demand. Reference materials are also purchased in a staggered fashion so that current reference materials are always available somewhere in town. The public librarian carries the books between sites. This Federation of libraries is unique in Vermont.


About Event Postings ** Under Construction**

Tell your readers about the next meeting, summer picnic, holiday party, and so on. Include information like event location, instructions for signing up, and cost. Type your text here. Type your text here. Type your text here. Type your text here. Type your text here. Type your text here. Type your text here. Type your text here. Type your text here. Type your text here. Type your text here.

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Bicentenial Building

 

Peabody Library


Component Libraries

In 1972, the libraries of the villages united to form a working "federation". One village library in Thetford Center donated its collection to the largest "town" library on Thetford Hill and closed its doors. Latham and Peabody libraries joined the Historical Society Library, the Thetford Academy Library, and the Elementary School Library in the Federation. The original intent of the Federation was a unified system for the whole town.

The Thetford Library Federation

The five member libraries enjoy the benefits of a plan of service that encourages collections to complement rather than duplicate each other and tailor programs to fit groups active in the specific libraries. New materials are bought on a staggered schedule so fresh titles are offered when they are most in demand. Reference materials are also purchased in a staggered fashion so that current reference materials are always available somewhere in town. Books are shared by the libraries. Currently the public librarian carries the books between sites. This Federation of libraries is unique in Vermont.

Thetford Historical Society Library

The Historical Society Library opened in 1975 with the construction of the Bicentennial Building. It contains about 3,000 volumes. It is one of the few Historical Society libraries in Vermont with its holdings on file at the State Historical Society and is much used by people from Dartmouth to Australia although it's open mostly by request and good will. It houses a diverse collection. Already widely-used, it can be a valuable statewide resource for schools and other libraries once the catalog is on-line.

Latham Memorial Library

The Latham Library shares the Bicentennial Building with the Thetford Historical Society. It holds a collection of 14,316 volumes. Sixty magazines and five newspapers are available.

George Peabody Library

George Peabody Library in Post Mills is the village library in the Federation. Built in 1866, it was the gift of the banker-philanthropist better known for his museums at Harvard, Yale, and Baltimore. As Thetford's first library housed in the oldest library building in Vermont, it boasted a grand collection of 6,000 volumes and was the largest library for thirty miles within the state. The Peabody Library has a current collection of 6,690 volumes with an annual circulation of 1,789 and 1,090 visitors using the library.

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Nova Development Art Explosion


About News Postings ** Under Construction**

Use interviews to let your readers in "behind the scenes" and to give a personal meaning to the news. If you prepare well for an interview, most people are happy to cooperate. Here are some tips that should make the interview process smoother.

Before

Tell the person you'll be interviewing what topics you plan to cover and how much time the interview will take. Ask for background materials to help you prepare questions. Ask about subjects to avoid, and make a note of those subjects.

If you can scan and print images, ask the person to provide a small photograph to publish with the interview.

Arrive early. Give yourself and the person you're interviewing time to settle in and talk informally for a few minutes before you start taking notes. While you're chatting, confirm the time limit for the interview, what you'll be covering, and any topics you've agreed to avoid.

Keep the discussion on track. Make sure the answers match the questions you ask. If the conversation wanders, repeat the original question. Get specifics. Check your facts - ask for correct titles and the correct spelling for each name.

If the interview goes too fast for you to take notes, ask for a pause so you can catch up. The person you interview will appreciate your attention to detail. Don't be afraid to ask the person to explain a point, or repeat a name.

Before you leave, thank the person you've interviewed. Let him or her know when you plan to print the interview.

After

Write up your notes immediately. Don't wait; after a busy day or a night's sleep, the best quotes and important details may fade.

Send the person who gave you the interview a complementary copy of the newsletter. Let the person see that the time with you was well spent. (This can also be good advertising for your publication.)

An interview can be a good way to lead into an abstract or complicated subject with a personal approach. You may even want to add a background article to round out the information you've gathered through the interview process.

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Last Modified 11/05 by Bill Weyrick